Measuring the True Wealth In Our Lives

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– From an article originally written in 2009

I’ve just spent another day trying to not watch the stock market go down again. For months I’ve been hearing bad economic report after bad economic report and witnessed my savings and retirement erode in a steady decline. I’ve been stuck in an orgy of wishing and hoping without any significant cooperation from reality. I don’t know whether things will get better or worse but I do know that I can do little or nothing to change what happens. The situation is awful and my mood reflects that.

These trying economic times are greatly threatening our sense of security. Many of us have seen our plans for a secure financial future radically altered if not blown to smithereens. People are suffering, fearing what the future might bring. We are unhappy with our lives and stressed to our limits. When stressed like this, we can become depressed, anxious, irritable and pessimistic. Dealing with the burden of providing for our families in an economic environment filled with failure and uncertainty, we are hard-pressed to summon the personal resources to be happy or even agreeable.

When I come home after work I’m just “not in the mood.” Everything is an irritant to the already bad mood that I’m in. I don’t want to hear about my wife’s day and I don’t feel like telling her about mine. I am a walking bummer. I could say “walking, talking bummer” but I’m not talking much, and I’m certainly no fun to be with. I can easily justify not being in a very good mood and I can find lots of people to join me in proving that misery loves company. It’s hard for me to feel anything but anxious, confused and helpless.

In these hard times it seems reasonable to be unhappy and unreasonable to be happy. How in the world can I be happy when faced with the possibility of not being able to retire or even live in the financially comfortable manner I anticipated? You can understand this. I have good reason to be in a bad mood. But do I have to be unhappy even when I have good reason to be? Do I have to let these unarguably bad financial circumstances determine my mood and wreak havoc on the rest of my life? The answer is – I don’t. Being unhappy is a reasonable choice that I have been making because of my failure to recognize the true wealth in my life. I need to make the unreasonable choice of being happy in spite of my financial status.

When I come home from work I’m usually greeted by my wife who loves me no matter what the stock market did today. And when I’m in the right mood we have great fun together. Our girls are grown and out of the home, but whenever I call them they are happy to hear from me. And my dog, Sheba, is amazing. She acts like I have a filet mignon in my pocket just for her. And she’s just as thrilled if I don’t. I am a wealthy and fortunate man. I’m wealthy no matter how much money I have and all I have to do to stay wealthy is continue to recognize my wealth of relationship, be grateful for it and treat my relationships with the respect, commitment and caring they deserve.

When we limit our concept of wealth to material possessions and resources we fail to recognize other forms that abundance takes in our lives. Consider all the relationships in your life: your spouse or partner, your children, your friends, relatives and even your pets. We all have at least the possibility of accumulating great wealth in the relationship arena. And it is a place where we can have great influence. We can treat those around us with respect and expressed appreciation and build a virtual Fort Knox of relationship wealth. No matter what the present status of your relationships, great wealth is possible because almost all people are open to better relationships almost all of the time.

I want to take the wild guess that most of you have already accumulated a great deal of wealth in the relationship arena. If so you have a decision about how to use this wealth to either increase it or decrease it. When we are having a difficult time in our lives, and lately almost all of us have had a difficult time in the financial arena, we can use our relationships as either dumping grounds or oases. If we come home in a bad mood and are impatient, irritable, short, and over reactive to what happens, then we are using our relationships as a dumping ground. If we come home and talk about what we’re experiencing, sharing our emotions and concerns, then we are using our relationships as an oasis where we can replenish ourselves with the attention, caring and compassion that those who love us are more than willing to provide if we let them.

When we start to naturally feel better from being allowed to express ourselves we free ourselves to remember where the true wealth in our lives lies. Think about what’s really important in our lives. In the end it is the relationships we create and the contribution we make to each other. Very few on their deathbed wish they had made more money or accumulated more possessions. Most wish they had spent more time with those they love. Knowing that, we can do that now and enjoy the greatest wealth that we have in our lives. It is the people who we love and who love us.

No matter where the stock market is, no matter what the economy is doing, we can several times a day recognize how wealthy we are, thinking of those we love and feeling blessed and grateful for the true wealth we enjoy in our lives.

I’ve just spent another day trying to not watch the stock market go down again. For months I’ve been hearing bad economic report after bad economic report and witnessed my savings and retirement erode in a steady decline. I’ve been stuck in an orgy of wishing and hoping without any significant cooperation from reality. I don’t know whether things will get better or worse but I do know that I can do little or nothing to change what happens. The situation is awful and my mood reflects that.

These trying economic times are greatly threatening our sense of security. Many of us have seen our plans for a secure financial future radically altered if not blown to smithereens. People are suffering, fearing what the future might bring. We are unhappy with our lives and stressed to our limits. When stressed like this, we can become depressed, anxious, irritable and pessimistic. Dealing with the burden of providing for our families in an economic environment filled with failure and uncertainty, we are hard-pressed to summon the personal resources to be happy or even agreeable.

When I come home after work I’m just “not in the mood.” Everything is an irritant to the already bad mood that I’m in. I don’t want to hear about my wife’s day and I don’t feel like telling her about mine. I am a walking bummer. I could say “walking, talking bummer” but I’m not talking much, and I’m certainly no fun to be with. I can easily justify not being in a very good mood and I can find lots of people to join me in proving that misery loves company. It’s hard for me to feel anything but anxious, confused and helpless.

In these hard times it seems reasonable to be unhappy and unreasonable to be happy. How in the world can I be happy when faced with the possibility of not being able to retire or even live in the financially comfortable manner I anticipated? You can understand this. I have good reason to be in a bad mood. But do I have to be unhappy even when I have good reason to be? Do I have to let these unarguably bad financial circumstances determine my mood and wreak havoc on the rest of my life? The answer is – I don’t. Being unhappy is a reasonable choice that I have been making because of my failure to recognize the true wealth in my life. I need to make the unreasonable choice of being happy in spite of my financial status.

When I come home from work I’m usually greeted by my wife who loves me no matter what the stock market did today. And when I’m in the right mood we have great fun together. Our girls are grown and out of the home, but whenever I call them they are happy to hear from me. And my dog, Sheba, is amazing. She acts like I have a filet mignon in my pocket just for her. And she’s just as thrilled if I don’t. I am a wealthy and fortunate man. I’m wealthy no matter how much money I have and all I have to do to stay wealthy is continue to recognize my wealth of relationship, be grateful for it and treat my relationships with the respect, commitment and caring they deserve.

When we limit our concept of wealth to material possessions and resources we fail to recognize other forms that abundance takes in our lives. Consider all the relationships in your life: your spouse or partner, your children, your friends, relatives and even your pets. We all have at least the possibility of accumulating great wealth in the relationship arena. And it is a place where we can have great influence. We can treat those around us with respect and expressed appreciation and build a virtual Fort Knox of relationship wealth. No matter what the present status of your relationships, great wealth is possible because almost all people are open to better relationships almost all of the time.

I want to take the wild guess that most of you have already accumulated a great deal of wealth in the relationship arena. If so you have a decision about how to use this wealth to either increase it or decrease it. When we are having a difficult time in our lives, and lately almost all of us have had a difficult time in the financial arena, we can use our relationships as either dumping grounds or oases. If we come home in a bad mood and are impatient, irritable, short, and over reactive to what happens, then we are using our relationships as a dumping ground. If we come home and talk about what we’re experiencing, sharing our emotions and concerns, then we are using our relationships as an oasis where we can replenish ourselves with the attention, caring and compassion that those who love us are more than willing to provide if we let them.

When we start to naturally feel better from being allowed to express ourselves.

I’ve just spent another day trying to not watch the stock market go down again. For months I’ve been hearing bad economic report after bad economic report and witnessed my savings and retirement erode in a steady decline. I’ve been stuck in an orgy of wishing and hoping without any significant cooperation from reality. I don’t know whether things will get better or worse but I do know that I can do little or nothing to change what happens. The situation is awful and my mood reflects that.

These trying economic times are greatly threatening our sense of security. Many of us have seen our plans for a secure financial future radically altered if not blown to smithereens. People are suffering, fearing what the future might bring. We are unhappy with our lives and stressed to our limits. When stressed like this, we can become depressed, anxious, irritable and pessimistic. Dealing with the burden of providing for our families in an economic environment filled with failure and uncertainty, we are hard-pressed to summon the personal resources to be happy or even agreeable.

When I come home after work I’m just “not in the mood.” Everything is an irritant to the already bad mood that I’m in. I don’t want to hear about my wife’s day and I don’t feel like telling her about mine. I am a walking bummer. I could say “walking, talking bummer” but I’m not talking much, and I’m certainly no fun to be with. I can easily justify not being in a very good mood and I can find lots of people to join me in proving that misery loves company. It’s hard for me to feel anything but anxious, confused and helpless.

In these hard times it seems reasonable to be unhappy and unreasonable to be happy. How in the world can I be happy when faced with the possibility of not being able to retire or even live in the financially comfortable manner I anticipated? You can understand this. I have good reason to be in a bad mood. But do I have to be unhappy even when I have good reason to be? Do I have to let these unarguably bad financial circumstances determine my mood and wreak havoc on the rest of my life? The answer is – I don’t. Being unhappy is a reasonable choice that I have been making because of my failure to recognize the true wealth in my life. I need to make the unreasonable choice of being happy in spite of my financial status.

When I come home from work I’m usually greeted by my wife who loves me no matter what the stock market did today. And when I’m in the right mood we have great fun together. Our girls are grown and out of the home, but whenever I call them they are happy to hear from me. And my dog, Sheba, is amazing. She acts like I have a filet mignon in my pocket just for her. And she’s just as thrilled if I don’t. I am a wealthy and fortunate man. I’m wealthy no matter how much money I have and all I have to do to stay wealthy is continue to recognize my wealth of relationship, be grateful for it and treat my relationships with the respect, commitment and caring they deserve.

When we limit our concept of wealth to material possessions and resources we fail to recognize other forms that abundance takes in our lives. Consider all the relationships in your life: your spouse or partner, your children, your friends, relatives and even your pets. We all have at least the possibility of accumulating great wealth in the relationship arena. And it is a place where we can have great influence. We can treat those around us with respect and expressed appreciation and build a virtual Fort Knox of relationship wealth. No matter what the present status of your relationships, great wealth is possible because almost all people are open to better relationships almost all of the time.

I want to take the wild guess that most of you have already accumulated a great deal of wealth in the relationship arena. If so you have a decision about how to use this wealth to either increase it or decrease it. When we are having a difficult time in our lives, and lately almost all of us have had a difficult time in the financial arena, we can use our relationships as either dumping grounds or oases. If we come home in a bad mood and are impatient, irritable, short, and over reactive to what happens, then we are using our relationships as a dumping ground. If we come home and talk about what we’re experiencing, sharing our emotions and concerns, then we are using our relationships as an oasis where we can replenish ourselves with the attention, caring and compassion that those who love us are more than willing to provide if we let them.

When we start to naturally feel better from being allowed to express ourselves we free ourselves to remember where the true wealth in our lives lies. Think about what’s really important in our lives. In the end it is the relationships we create and the contribution we make to each other. Very few on their deathbed http://www.pattylattanzio.com/index.htmlwish they had made more money or accumulated more possessions. Most wish they had spent more time with those they love. Knowing that, we can do that now and enjoy the greatest wealth that we have in our lives. It is the people who we love and who love us.

No matter where the stock market is, no matter what the economy is doing, we can several times a day recognize how wealthy we are, thinking of those we love and feeling blessed and grateful for the true wealth we enjoy in our lives.

We free ourselves to remember where the true wealth in our lives lies. Think about what’s really important in our lives. In the end it is the relationships we create and the contribution we make to each other. Very few on their deathbed wish they had made more money or accumulated more possessions. Most wish they had spent more time with those they love. Knowing that, we can do that now and enjoy the greatest wealth that we have in our lives. It is the people who we love and who love us.

No matter where the stock market is, no matter what the economy is doing, we can several times a day recognize how wealthy we are, thinking of those we love and feeling blessed and grateful for the true wealth we enjoy in our lives.

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